2017 Meetings

The linked titles of some meetings are the presentations speakers provided.

May 09, 2017: " Rest-of-World Compliance for Wireless Products " Mark Maynard

Abstract: Obtaining international product compliance approvals for electrical and electronic devices is a key goal for manufacturers and developers wanting to get their products to an ever-larger market of potential customers. This need is growing with the expansion of governmental wireless/telecom regulatory requirements that are required for most modern electronic devices in this age of the "Internet of Things", or IoT. While much has been written on launching your products into the largest market countries in North America, the European Union, and the Asia-Pacific economic powerhouses of China, India, Japan, South Korea, Australia, and Taiwan, there has not been much published on the next secondary markets that should be accessed. Identifying these "next step" countries and their associated governmental telecom agencies is the focus of this presentation, along with exploring different metrics for evaluating if these potential markets make sense for your products.

Mark Maynard

Bio: Mark is the Business Development and Communications Manager at American Certification Body, Inc. He is an IEEE Senior Member, an active committee member for the annual IEEE Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Society Symposium since 2013, and a past-president of the IEEE Product Safety Engineering Society. He has spent over 25 years working in the Regulatory Compliance Engineering field for ITE and electronics, covering international product approvals for EMC/EMI, Wireless/Telecom, Product Safety, and Design for the Environment. Mark is a frequent contributor to In Compliance magazine, and conducting compliance engineering training has been one of his key job functions since 2013. He has two degrees from Texas State University, one in Mathematics, and the other in Business & Marketing.


April 11, 2017: " Statistical Process Control (SPC) for an EMC Laboratory " Kimball Williams

Abstract: Measurement system variability in a test laboratory can be a source of discomfort for the test engineer, the designer and management. This is especially true in product development laboratories where the question of exactly what effect a design change had on system behavior is of central interest. The use of Statistical Process Control (SPC) methods to gage and track the variability of system measurements can provide confidence in the repeatability of the system setup, and in the data it produces. However, the use of SPC in an EMC Lab, especially for frequency domain measurements, requires decisions to limit the quantity of the data to avoid information overload. To accomplish this careful selection of the measurement methods is essential.

Bio: Kimball Williams completed his career and retired from DENSO as a " Technical Fellow " in 2012 after managing its EMC Test Laboratory. He is an iNARTE certified Master EMC Design Engineer, EMC Test Engineer and ESD Test Engineer with Lifetime certification from iNARTE. Kim is also an IEEE Senior Life Member and Past Chair of the IEEE Southeastern Michigan Section and an ' Honored Member ' of the IEEE EMC Society where he serves as one of the Past Presidents Emeritus and current Director of Professional Activities. Kim is a licensed private pilot, PADDY certified scuba diver, licensed amateur radio operator (Call sign: N8FNC) and plays classical guitar in his ' spare ' time.


February 14, 2017: " Effective, Small, and Inexpensive Common-Mode EMI Reduction Using Inverse Secondary Current Cancellation " Randall Elliott

Abstract: This presentation is about implementation of a small, cheap and highly effective (10-20dB) EMI reduction method attacking the 150kHz to 3MHz range of Conducted EMI from the most notorious source. It is particularly effective where 2-wire AC input (no AC ground) is used, if 50-60Hz output leakage current is an issue, or improvement to space, cost and efficiency is desired. It reduces or eliminates traditional brute-force filtering, transformer shielding and other "conventional" methods.

Bio: Over 40 years in electronics from a USFS Comm Tech Assistant in 1973. Recruited by Tektronix from Idaho State University in 1978, Randy has explored many positions in Portland-area high-tech companies often involving unusual analog and power designs with EMI suppression. These include: Motor Drivers at Synektron, Industrial Control Systems at Precision Interconnect, Optical Spectrum Analyzer at Photon Kinetics, CCD Camera Systems at SiTE/PixelVision, Power Supply FAE for Delta Electronics (Taiwan), Fitness Equipment with Nautilus, Lighting Controls for Leviton, Energy Meters at Veris/Schneider, assorted side jobs through Randoid LLC.Licensed Professional Engineer since 1999 and Amateur Radio Extra Class since 2006. President of Tigard CERT Amateur Radio Group. Pursuits into renewable energy, water treatment and Ham Radio antenna and balun projects. Randy is an IEEE Senior Member of the Power Electronics, EMC, Product Safety, Circuits and Systems, Antennas and Propagation, and Magnetics Societies.


January 10, 2017: " Emission Source Microscopy and related near field scanning methods " David Pommerenke, Electromagnetic Compatibility Laboratory at Missouri University of S&T

Abstract: Near field scanning visualizes the fields close to a product, e.g., an IC or PCB. However, it misleads us often by letting us associate areas of strong near field with causes of far field radiation. For example, if a microstrip trace is scanned it will show strong near fields over the trace. However, these fields do not radiate! Only the beginning and end of the microstrip cause the radiation. Emissions source microscopy allows to only visualize the radiating fields, any none radiating fields will not be shown. This sounds great, but it comes at a price: The resolution of near field scanning is determined by the probe size, and the probe to source structure distance. Thus, it can achieve 0.5mm or better. Emissions source microscopy has the same limitations as optical microscopy: The resolution is about lambda/2. Good at 30GHz, not really useful on a PCB at 500MHz. The talk will introduce the emissions source microscopy, show how limitations can be partially overcome, show that the total radiated power can rather easily be determined and illustrate by example that a complete scan can be performed in 10min. The method allows numerical " what if " experiments, by masking radiating areas one can quantify how large the contribution of each area is. Examples will be shown and other scanning techniques, such as ESD susceptibility scanning will be discussed.

David Pommerenke

Bio: David Pommerenke ' s research interests are system level ESD, electronics, numerical simulations, EMC measurement methods and instrumentations. He received the Ph.D. from the Technical University Berlin, Germany in 1996. After working at Hewlett Packard for 5 years he joined the Electromagnetic Compatibility Laboratory at the Missouri University of S&T in 2001 where he is professor . He is IEEE fellow and associated editor for the IEEE Transactions on EMC and published > 200 papers on areas ranging from high voltage to numerical methods with the main emphasis on measurement methods and ESD.